Squirreled

Squirrel InbarAsif

Photo: Inbar Asif

 

In the deep chill of winter

It got caught en route

To a squirreled away

Acorn nuts loot.

 

 

Dedicated with love to my Southern Hemisphere friends, on this solstice day.

For Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge

 

 

Sea Squill Sentry

Hatzav; Photo: AtaraKatz

Sea Squill ; Photo: Atara Katz

 

Standing sentry ‘afore

Greenery finds a path

It heralds end of summer

As dry days’

Aftermath.

Rising tall

It dares bloom

When most others will not,

Drawing water with roots

That reach deeper

Than most.

 

Fun facts: The Sea Squill (Urginea Maritimia) has large bulbs that average 8 inches (20 centimeters) across, and strong roots that reach depths of 14 feet (4 meters) below ground, and can snake their way into narrow cracks in rocks, widening the cracks and ‘hueing’ through the rock to get to moisture. The roots are so difficult to dislodge that ancient farmers would plant rows of Sea Squill at the edges of their fields and those were considered a permanent boundary marker. The flowering spears of the plant reach up to 6.5 feet (2 meters) in height and carry 200-300 flowers. Many parts of the plant are poisonous but the bulb also holds medicinal qualities similar to digoxin.

 

For Cee’s Flower Of The Day

 

Walk This Way

Ein Pit OsnatHalperinBarlev

Photo: Osnat Halperin-Barlev

 

Walk this way

To the water

Where the goats

Cleared a path.

Walk this way

Where the feet

Of the ancients

Have passed.

Walk this way

Little brother

I will give you

My hand.

Walk this way

And together

Our adventures

Expand.

 

 

For Cee’s Which Way Photo Challenge

 

Pretty in Pink

Rakafot AtaraKatz

Persian Cyclamen; Photo: Atara Katz

 

Don’t be fooled by the blush

Or swan’s head

In a bow

Strength does not always show

But do not try to

Chow

There is more to this beauty

Than what meets

The eye

Even if in first glance

She appears to be

Shy.

 

 

Fun Fact: The tuber of this flower is semi-poisonous. Fishermen would grate it, mix it with water and lime, and sprinkle the mixture in lakes and ponds to stun the fish so they would rise to the surface to be collected.

For Cee’s Flower of the Day

 

Mantic

Praying Mantis Dvora Freedman

Photo: Dvora Freedman

 

In a world of Divine

Prophecies

Of all kinds,

Little wonder

A Mantis

Folds green limbs

To Life’s design.

 

 

Merriam-Webster’s word for June 13, 2018:

Mantic

This post continues the blogging challenge in which Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day, serves as inspiration a-la the “Daily Prompt.”

Want to join me? Feel free to link to this post on your blog, and/or post a link to your blogpost in the comment section below so others can enjoy it, too. Poetry, photography, short stories, anecdotes: Go for it!

For more visibility, tag your post with #WordOfDayNY, so your post can be searchable.

“Follow” me if you want to receive future prompts, or just pop in when you’re looking for inspiration. Here’s to the fun of writing and our ever-evolving blogging community!

 

Age Value

Water worn AmitaiAsif

Photo: Amitai Asif

 

Water-worn by the ages

By the floods

By the rain,

Time has carved

Eras’ layers

Through the rock

Grain by grain.

Scars of years

Line the wadi

To funnel life –

None in vain.

 

 

For The Tuesday Photo Challenge

Walk The Future

day trip ChagitMoriahGibor

Photo: Chagit Moriah-Gibor

 

Hold my hand

And we’ll go

Up the hill

As we sow

Seeds of light

For the thrill

Of just watching

You grow.

 

 

For The Sunday Stills Challenge: Future

Changeling Flower

 

Achnai AmitaiAsif

Echium judaeum (Photo: Amitai Asif)

 

As you walk in the mountains

In wild meadows and deserts

O’er Rocks

Towards the Sun,

Hear the whiskery stalks’ whisper:

“You have seen,

I have grown,

Now be gone.”

 

Fun fact: The blooms of the Echium Judaeum change color after pollination.

For Cee’s Flower of the Day