Do Not Be Silenced

The Childrens Holocaust Memorial Yad Vashem
The Children’s Memorial, Yad Vashem

 

 

In remembrance of times

Of horror

Never to repeat

Never to minimize:

Do not shy

Of voice

Do not shy

Of fact

Do not shy

Of holding truth

To challenge

Those who in their blindness,

In their hunger to cause pain,

Seek to deny

The cost of hate

The force of harm

The voice of those who had been silenced.

Do not be silenced.

Be brave.

Walk tall.

Remember:

Those who seek to silence

To zip history closed

To limit learning,

Can only do so

If they make you forget

The truth

Entrusted to you — to all of us —

By those who’d perished

And those who’d managed

To survive.

 

 

 

For The Daily Post

 

Elixir of Hope: The Recipe

elixir

In one heart, mix equal parts:

Pearls of connection, words of caring, acts of kindness, steps of courage, hugs of comfort, breaths of peace, paths of truth, smiles of joy, touches of compassion.

Brew with gentleness till ample Hope forms.

 

For The Daily Post

Hang in the Balance

balance

We all hang in the balance.

Can’t you see?

Be gentle.

Be truthful.

Be fair.

Above all–be kind.

We all hang in the balance.

Do you understand?

The smallest. The heavy. The brazen. The meek. The old. The young.

We all hang in the balance.

It matters.

Above all–be kind.

Peace

In this time of repeated violence, I find solace in the truths that do not fade, for they hold more substance than fleeting words, shoulder shrugs, denials, numbness, pretense, or calls for more violence as a ‘solution’ for the inordinate violence that’s already there.

Truths remain. Even in the face of the most urgent attempts to smother it.

In this time of sorrow and frustration, I am reminded:

“There is no way to peace.

Peace is the way.”

                                             (A. J. Muste)

And

“The person who says it cannot be done

should not interrupt the person doing it…”

                                                  (Chinese Proverb)

From NPR.org by NASA

From NPR.org by NASA

The Connection that Never Was

Am sharing the article below because there is benefit to reducing the worry and panic and misconceptions among those who still hear things about the supposed connection between autism and vaccination, and don’t know or never had good access to the facts.

This recent article in JAMA is one more study that shows NO CONNECTION between the MMR Vaccine and Autism. In fact, there never WAS a connection. In fact, no peer reviewed studies ever did show a connection. The study that caused the original panic was — by the admission of the researcher himself — made up and the results were falsified. The article was withdrawn a long time ago from reputable journals, and the scientist has been discredited for the results he falsified. Furthermore, his claims were never replicated (not surprisingly, given that they were false from the get go), and there has never been any support for the connection.

Some children may have adverse effects to vaccines–or to any medication or substance for that matter. Children can react to cotton, wool, milk, wheat, sugar, natural vegetable dyes, sweet potato, eggplant, broccoli, eggs–just about anything. This does not make the rare reactions mean that these substances should be avoided generally, or that they ’cause’ diseases. Vaccinations do not cause autism. There has never been any support for that, and many people did try to find it. They did not.

I hope this current publication in one of the most prestigious and rigorous journals in the world will help straighten out some of the facts for those who are still worried.

Vaccines save lives. They do not cause Autism. Never had.

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2275444#

vaccines work

Truth Be Told–From the Mouths of Babes

“What does it mean, to tell the truth?”

A child asked me that. As usual, they are my greatest teachers. “What do you think?” I returned the question, wondering at the child’s working hypothesis (and chickening out just a little bit–let the munchkin do the hard work …).

I got the look I deserved, and: “To not be a liar.”

“Hmm,” I non-committed. “What does it mean to lie?”

“To say you didn’t do it but you did?” he tried. “And to be mean.”

I raised an eyebrow. This kid was good at reading body language.

“Yeah, because someone else get in trouble.”

“Oh, I can see how that would not be very nice, to get someone else in trouble. Anything else lying means?”

A moment of scrunched forehead. “Is it still lying even if you pretend you didn’t do it but you don’t say?”

“What do you think?”

A sage nod. A sigh. “Yeah, it still mean. Someone still get in trouble, right? Because the teacher think its them.”

“So…” I prompted (he was doing so well on his own, I felt like my words would be interfering).

“So … telling the truth is being not mean?” he ventured. His little face was quite serious, thinking this through.

“Hmm.”

“But truth is hard,” he sighed, a six-year-old summing up centuries of philosophy. “It can get you in trouble. … you know, if you did bad things.”

He paused. “But … then you can say sorry, maybe. Maybe you won’t be in trouble. … if you’re lucky.”

“Yeah, being honest can help.”

Big brown eyes hung onto mine. “What do you think is worser, being mean or being in trouble?”

Tough one. I’m returning it to him. “What do you think?”

“Being mean.” He did not hesitate. “Being mean is worser.”

“How come?” I pushed. Curious. Enchanted by this child.

“Oh … because … being mean makes me more in trouble,” he stated. Pointed to his midriff. “With my heart.”

Old soul, big spirit, that.

gandhi