Crowned Warmth

chartzit OfirAsif

Photo: Ofir Asif

 

In the small, darker moments

When light appears to be

Gone,

Recall life giving

Sunlight

Reflected

In crowned Chrysanthemum.

When the cold seeps

To sorrow

And the path may be

Lost,

Remember how the warmth

Of the many

Can the most hidden

Truths

Defrost.

 

 

A bit of trivia: Chrysanthemum Coronarium, AKA Glebionis Coronaria, is an edible variant of the Daisy family (the greens are eaten). It is native to the Mediterranean region but is cultivated in Asia, and more recently in North America. The plant is rich in minerals and vitamins, including potassium and carotene. Some toxic properties (dioxin) have been observed and extracts of the plant can inhibit the growth of some helpful gut flora.

 

For Cee’s Flower of the Day

Flower of First Rain

sitvanit AmitaiAsif

Photo: Amitai Asif

 

It emerges in fall

Flowers preceding leaves

To mark the last

Breath of summer

And the bounty that winter

Will soon retrieve.

 

Colchicum stevenii grows in the Mediterranean region and throughout Israel, blooming between October and December. Its name in Hebrew “Sitvanit Ha’Yore” literally means “Fall flower of first rains.” Flowers range from 1-2 inches (2-5 centimeters), with petals shaped from straight ruler-like petals to egg-like. Petals’ hues can be lilac or pink to almost white. The bulb contain colchicine, a toxic/poisonous material that is used in medicine to treat arterial diseases and gout.

 

For Cee’s Flower of the Day

May Apple

Mayapple flower PhilipCoons

Photo: Philip Coons

 

Not ripe in May

Not quite an apple

Mandrake grows best

In partial dapple.

No screams will sound

When it is pulled

Though tales will try

To have you fooled.

The fruit is fine

In moderation

But beware of higher

Concentration.

Medicinal

Though it may well be,

Won’t eat the seeds

If it were me.

 

 

For Cee’s Flower of the Day

 

 

Sea Squill Sentry

Hatzav; Photo: AtaraKatz

Sea Squill ; Photo: Atara Katz

 

Standing sentry ‘afore

Greenery finds a path

It heralds end of summer

As dry days’

Aftermath.

Rising tall

It dares bloom

When most others will not,

Drawing water with roots

That reach deeper

Than most.

 

Fun facts: The Sea Squill (Urginea Maritimia) has large bulbs that average 8 inches (20 centimeters) across, and strong roots that reach depths of 14 feet (4 meters) below ground, and can snake their way into narrow cracks in rocks, widening the cracks and ‘hueing’ through the rock to get to moisture. The roots are so difficult to dislodge that ancient farmers would plant rows of Sea Squill at the edges of their fields and those were considered a permanent boundary marker. The flowering spears of the plant reach up to 6.5 feet (2 meters) in height and carry 200-300 flowers. Many parts of the plant are poisonous but the bulb also holds medicinal qualities similar to digoxin.

 

For Cee’s Flower Of The Day

 

Pretty in Pink

Rakafot AtaraKatz

Persian Cyclamen; Photo: Atara Katz

 

Don’t be fooled by the blush

Or swan’s head

In a bow

Strength does not always show

But do not try to

Chow

There is more to this beauty

Than what meets

The eye

Even if in first glance

She appears to be

Shy.

 

 

Fun Fact: The tuber of this flower is semi-poisonous. Fishermen would grate it, mix it with water and lime, and sprinkle the mixture in lakes and ponds to stun the fish so they would rise to the surface to be collected.

For Cee’s Flower of the Day