Quietude

Take some time to be quiet.

Quietude. Do you remember what it is?

“Impossible,” some say. “Unrealistic.”

“Maybe the next time I am on vacation,” others lament wistfully, “… don’t know when … maybe next year. If I can manage it. Somehow.”

In this world of ours, it may be difficult to imagine taking time for quiet. Maybe harder still to figure out how. Logistics, you know. The noise of churning plans.

If you must, make a quiet-date with yourself. And keep it. But if you can let yourself release a moment of control and grab a quiet moment, do so. Today. Now.

Just do it.

Take a minute. Take two breaths. Take five minutes if you can. A half-hour if you’re extra-lucky and the stars align. A few hours if you’ve won the My-Time-Lottery …

Find a bit of quietude. This day.

A bit tomorrow, when you can.

And the next …

Whatever brief respite you clear up in your mind–take it. Make it yours. Be quiet in it. This is worth it for you, but will also pricelessly teach others who need knowing, who forgot the way to be quiet, who maybe had never learned how.

Little ones, too, need quiet time.

Some of them do not know, either. About silence. Constant beeping, typing, video, screen time, phone time, entertainment, play-dates, lessons, coaching, characters and things that move and ping and chime and replay high-pitch recordings.

Brains need quiet like they need oxygen. Like they need love. Like they need soul.

Show them you believe that quietude is important. Show them you know how … begin now …

Oh, I know it is a rare thing; silence.

In this busy, hustle-bustle, to-do lists and beeping phones, email, texts, chats, calls, meetings, reports, social obligations, family events, work mingling, and information pouring in through every moment, every pore … there is noise just about everywhere. A hiss, a buzz, a murmur, background hum of electronics, cars, people, needs, demands, small children, needy neighbors, ailing parents, crises calls …

It is because of all of that that it is all the more important to take time for quiet.

To re-align your center. To restore the foundation of yourself–of who you are and where you’re going and what makes you who you are and what calms your body why and how. Yes, all that in a moment of quietude. For once not in words, but silence.

Take time for quiet.

Let quiet in. Allow it home, again.

Take time for a calm, clear breath and momentarily emptied mind.

A pause for calibrating a brief neutral.

Be silent. Lower volume on your inner critics (they can use a moment of silence, too!).

Just take a moment. Listen to nothing but the beating of your heart, the music of your soul, the nothingness that holds the breath of life around you.

The pulse of nature.

The space between the spaces.

Silent. Powerful. Whole.

quiet

4 thoughts on “Quietude

    • Yes, some of them do. And some of them are never allowed to just day-dream and get bored–there is too much scheduled, too much to fit into the day… also, the children are so easily ‘baby-sat’ by the phone/tablet, to let the adults get their own stuff done … but yes, quiet time–not as a punishment (time out is such a misnomer…), but as a welcome break.

  1. Very good. My younger son needs quiet–and the good thing is that he knows it. He will retreat somewhere (when he can) if he gets too overwhelmed and emerge only when he feels refreshed. I pray that he will always keep his awareness of his need for quietude and never shrug it off.
    Quietude: My goal for this week. 🙂 Thank you!

    • You are welcome. Thank you for sharing your son’s story of needing–and seeking quietude–I think that a lot of children have the ability to do so, if we let them find it, and if we allow them the space to be while being aware of being around to when they may need us. Learning to self-soothe and self-regulate, and take a moment when one needs to is a skill for life!

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