Partially Installed

 

“So it’s full of juice?”

Robin rolled her eyes. Her brother was too thick for his own good.

“No, Dufus. It is hollow. Or mostly.”

The boy’s eyes stared glassily.

“Don’t know what hollow means, do you?”

He shook his head and tugged on her hand pleadingly.

Robin sighed. Little brothers should come with language already fully installed.

“It means it has space inside. Like a balloon. Sort of. Only it won’t pop.”

Donnie glanced at the sphere and the concession stand at its bottom. “A juice balloon?”

Robin snorted. “Can you imagine?”

Donnie grinned.

Apparently, they both could.

 

 

 

For Rochelle’s Friday Fictioneers

Photo: © Dale Rogerson

 

63 thoughts on “Partially Installed

      • I so totally am!!!! 🙂 I wish for EVERYONE to have a profession where they still love it as much if not more after more than 30 years and are still learning throughout. And … the kids are DELICIOUS! 🙂

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      • You see, me? I can’t do the kids thing… I love mine because, well, they’re mine and I have to 😉 And my sisters’ kids, coz they’re family but outside of that? Meh! 😉
        But yeah, it must be so cool to love what you do. Sigh.

        Liked by 1 person

      • LOL, I’m a mush when it comes to kids. Babies, especially, give me a melt-on-sight reaction. When we used to go to restaurants, you know, when the world still worked as intended, my friends would position me so I could not see any other tables, because they know that if a baby entered the premises, my attention would inevitable wander … LOL
        Granted, kids can be grating, especially some behaviors, but more often than not, I find children (yes, even teens) to be delightful. There’s a freshness to their view that is fun and insightful and funny. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Buahahaha! Yeah, not my case. At all. My neighbour was like that from the age of 5!
        I was sitting in my backyard trying to finish this wonderful book by an awesome author, you might know her? She goes by the name of Na’ama Yehuda. Anyway, two houses down the kids were screaming and crying… I wanted to kill them. My direct neighbours have two kids also and their pool is next to the fence so. Yeah, there are days when I just have to go inside.

        Liked by 1 person

      • 🙂 Wait … which book are you reading now? Or, were you referring to when you were trying to peacefully finish reading Outlawed Hope?
        Also, I do love kids, but it doesn’t mean they can’t be annoying (and/or the adults who are supposed to help them not be screaming/crying …). Sometimes, yeah, you need to go inside … but I wish your neighbors were less … um … grating … 😉
        (P.S. I LOVE being an “awesome author” 🙂 )

        Liked by 1 person

      • No, now I’m reading Claire Fuller’s “Unsettled Ground”. This is when I was trying to peacefully read yours. Yes, usually when kids are annoying, it’s the parents I wanna smack.
        Well, you ARE an awesome author! 😀

        Liked by 1 person

      • I thought you’d meant OH over the weekend, but just wanted to double check. Because, you know, vanity … 😀
        And … yeah, it is often the parents/caregivers that are at least a big part of (if not THE) the issue. …

        Liked by 1 person

  1. Na’ama Y’karah,

    Are you sure you never had a little brother? Such natural dialogue. Kids. Gotta love em. I remember when my eldest son came home from school with a new bit of knowledge and excitedly told me that in some countries fish eggs were a great delicatessen.
    Love this and I love your love and passion for children. It comes through so vividly and charmingly in your writing.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    • Not a little brother (we are all girls!) but two younger sisters and I’ve been an aunt and a nieces-and-nephews sitter since age 10 … so the situation is … well … familiar … 😉
      Also, yes, kids are delightful this way, aren’t they? I do love it that he heard that fish eggs are a great delicatessen … 😀
      🙂 Thanks for this lovely comment, my friend!
      Na’ama

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