The Twins

syd-wachs-ws8XXuc-i_4-unsplash

Photo: Syd Wachs on Unsplash

 

They are twins but

They are not one

Being.

Identical, so many call them,

Breathless with

Duplicated magic.

But underneath the outward

Appearance

They are

Anything but.

Individually

Tempered

By the nuanced

Realities of who they

Really are.

 

 

 
For Sammi’s Weekend Writing Prompt: Nuance in 38 words

 

 

26 thoughts on “The Twins

    • Thanks for the comment, Laura! I think that twins, especially ‘identical’ twins, DO have a lot in common, and there may be a lot about them that reminds of the other. Nonetheless, they are their own person, and too many people expect them to be facsimiles of each other, which of course they are not.
      Great comment!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Not a twin myself, but I have worked with twins and I know twins, and I seen how difficult it can be for people to be their own person first and not part of a preconceived unit. And … I’m pretty independent … so I can feel how I’d strain against inability to individuate …

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Rochelle! xoxo
      So many people stop at the fascination with the ‘identical’ part and don’t realize that there is just as much individualism underneath it as in anyone. … Perhaps more, for needing to push through those who are blind to it. …

      Liked by 1 person

      • I can almost always tell Sarah and Katie apart in their photos by those certain little nuances. Katie tilts her head a certain way while Sarah is more in your face. (in a good way) Sarah’s the one who married my baby boy. Love these two young women. Sarah’s an artist and Katie’s a trained musician.

        Liked by 1 person

      • It’s those little nuances that matter so much, too, isn’t it? Much as twins sometimes enjoy playing tricks and seeing others have a hard time tell them apart, all games aside, most usually want to be seen as individuals and not lumped together as one entity or duplicates of the same. How not surprising that your son will find an artist for a mate … ๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

  1. My (identical, but now minor changes say maybe not) grand-elves. Now at 14, more individual and different personality growth is seen (teenage ‘maturity’).
    Referred to as “the girls” or by name(s), they obviously love being twins and are very close — much more than average siblings, in my opinion. Hugging requires two arms, one for each. I have been able to tell them apart as long as I’ve known them.
    I agree with the premise of your poem, but I suspect these two do not face not being seen by anyone as individuals. They are very aware of who they are, as both individuals and special twins.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think there are many families where the twin fun is not made into blending of the two into one. In many families twins get to enjoy their unique closeness AND to develop their individuality. I am glad that this is how it is in your family. I’d say that the poem represents the too-many-times I’d seen twins (especially ‘identical’ twins) treated as a unit beyond what the children wanted, and where there was almost a constant need to point out the similarities or negate the differences. So, yes, the twins in the poem are struggling to be seen as individuals (which, of course, does not need to mean they don’t cherish ALSO being par of twins).

      Liked by 1 person

      • Right. I’ve never discussed this with the (divorced) parents, but I suspect that they were aware of and trying not to do exactly what you are talking about. Neither girl has ever complained about any of that. But it seems to me that they get along with each other and their step brothers better than the average siblings.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh so true. I went to school with a few sets of identical twins – so different in character and some really close and others not so much.
    I hate when I see parents treating them as a single unit, not encouraging them to be individuals.
    Excellent take!

    Liked by 1 person

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